Roundwood Quay from Trelissick

Another walk from Trelissick today. We really enjoyed this walk and hope to return and see it later it the year. It’s the kind of place you could take a picnic and stay all afternoon. There’s plenty of variety and interest, from paddling in the stream to exploring the iron age fort and imagining the industry on the quay. Or sitting in the sun watching the boats and the birds.

The fort is the only one of its kind in Europe and its well defined ditches and embankments can still be seen. The quay has been a trading site since at least the iron age. The present structure was built in the 18th Century and used to ship copper and tin ore from Chacewater and North Downs mines.

We heard curlews on the water today. Eldest can now identify the sound they make, he says it’s easy to remember as it’s a ‘curly’ sound. Hear it here. Youngest was happy to get in the Tula for a sleep. I think we might need a few shorter walks to build up her stamina a bit!

What you need to know

Parking:  At Trelissick – free if you’re a national trust member. Or there are some spaces in a layby nearby but it means walking a little way along the road with no pavement.
Toilets: At Trelissick.
Cafe: At Trelissick.
Pushchair suitable? Mostly ok if you have something rugged. There are steps down to the Quay, see the picture below. There is a hard path, although the mud has taken over in places.
Time: 1.5 hours.

Directions

From the car park at Trelissick, head towards the parkland  over the cattle grid. Turn right and follow the path which will lead you to another cattle grid. Here there is a right fork signed ‘North Woodland Walk’. You will pass the Lodge on your right and reach the gated road crossing. Proceed with caution here!

Over the road, the path zigzags down into the valley. Turn left at the bottom of the path and cross the stream which flows out into Lamouth Creek and forms a picturesque waterfall.

Follow the path round and over the bridge.

The path continues on with the creek on your right. There is a circular walk round the iron age fort with stone steps leading down to the quay.

Return by the same route.

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And here we are again a year and a half later visiting with friends. I can’t believe how much the children have changed! We had a great time, and the autumn sunshine came through in the end.

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